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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 8, 2007 / 20 Iyar, 5767

PBS darling gets abused by PC police

By Rod Dreher


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Ken Burns is one of the great cinematic artists of our time. But not even his peerless reputation protected him from identity politics. Latino politicians and activists rolled him on The War, and PBS disgracefully let it happen.


This is not about denigrating the noble sacrifice of Latino soldiers. This is about corrupting art through politics.


To understand just how absurd the activists' demands are, realize that Mr. Burns did not set out to make a comprehensive portrait of the American experience in World War II. If he had, protesters would have a point.


Instead, the filmmaker chose to explore the war through the particular experiences of people in four geographically disparate towns: Sacramento, Calif.; Waterbury, Conn.; Luverne, Minn.; and Mobile, Ala. His film crew went to those locations and sought out anyone who had lived through the war — whether on the battlefield or the homefront — and was willing to talk about it.


They found African-Americans in some of those locales. They found Japanese-Americans too. They even found a Jewish former medic. What they didn't find was Latinos who had lived through the World War II era. No surprise there. Though the U.S. census didn't measure the Latino population discretely until 1970, it was almost certainly tiny relative to the rest of the U.S. population during the 1940s. And it was concentrated in the border states.


The point is, Hispanic veterans are absent from this documentary not because their sacrifice isn't valued. They weren't included because they didn't fit the perfectly legitimate storytelling frame chosen by the artist. It makes as much sense to complain that Mr. Burns insulted Texans by leaving Lone Star veterans out. Should the Texas congressional delegation demand redress (or at least rewrite)? Please.


What the Latino activists have done, thanks in part to pressure from Hispanic members of Congress, was to force a compromise, however slight, of a distinguished filmmaker's artistic vision for the sake of identity politics. This is a terrible precedent. PBS has opened the doors for any special-interest group to force its political agenda onto a work of art and historical storytelling.


Mr. Burns argues that when working in public television, one has to take the views of the public into consideration. That's true. If taxpayers don't want to pay for this or that kind of art, they shouldn't have to — even Ken Burns documentaries. But once a publicly funded artwork is approved, both art and artist must be protected from political interference.


Massaging history or art to assuage grievance is intellectually corrupt. Bullying an artist to alter or amend his work for socially therapeutic ends — that is, for political correctness — is immoral. The next time an ethnic, religious or other group demands the right to compel changes in a controversial PBS program, the network will have no ground to stand on.


Make no mistake, if activists and their congressional allies can do this to Ken Burns, they can do it to anybody.

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Rod Dreher is assistant editorial page editor of the Dallas Morning News and author of the forthcoming "Crunchy Cons" (Crown Forum).

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05/02/07 : Impervious to beauty and deadened to depravity
04/20/07 : What I know about being a loner
10/28/05 : How the conservatives crumble

© 2007, The Dallas Morning News, Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Information Services.

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