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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 8, 2011 / 4 Nissan, 5771

An Idea Whose Time Has Come — and Gone

By Bernard Goldberg



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | A few years ago, over dinner in Manhattan, a CBS network executive started talking about breakfast.

"A lot of people like cornflakes for breakfast," he said. "Not too many like cornflakes for dinner."

He was talking about Katie Couric, who wasn't doing well in the ratings.

It's an interesting way to look at it. Katie was cornflakes, immensely popular at breakfast time. Not so much at dinner time when people crave more substance.

But who knew five years ago when CBS News decided to pay Ms. Couric $15 million a year to take over the anchor chair that it wouldn't work out. That she would start in third place and end up in third place - and with even fewer viewers than she had in the beginning.

So Katie Couric, who had the pre-requisites — name recognition, a great smile, and a history of success — seemed like a good pick. Except, as William Goldman, the screen writer who wrote Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, among many other big movies, once famously said of the entertainment industry: when it comes to picking winners, "nobody knows anything."

So who's next? The only honest answer at this point is who knows. But whomever CBS picks, it's going to be an uphill climb. A lot of TV viewing is a function of habit. You pick a network newscast for all sorts of reasons and it usually takes a lot for you to switch. One thing, though, is for sure. Millions of viewers who don't normally watch the CBS Evening News will tune in during the first week of the new program. They'll want to see who the new (probably) guy is and what all the fuss is about. They did that when Katie took over. But before you could say "cornflakes" they were gone. The same thing could happen again with Couric's successor. But the fact is, "nobody knows anything."

And then there's the biggest problem of all for the new CBS anchor - and for all the others. Network evening newscasts are an idea whose time has come - and gone. They made sense 40 or 50 years ago, before cable television and the Internet. Back then, if you wanted to see national and world news on TV you had to be in front of your television set at dinner time. If you weren't there, you didn't see Walter Cronkite or Huntley and Brinkley. It was your loss.

Now, you can get the news at seven in the evening or two in the afternoon or noon or four in the morning. And you can get it on television or on your cell phone or on your computer or on your underpants. It's everywhere all day long. Once, Cronkite was the most trusted person in America. Does anybody really think Brian Williams or Diane Sawyer is the most trusted person in America today? Or to put it another way: the network evening news isn't that big a deal anymore.

So good luck New CBS News Anchor Person, whoever you are. And while it may be true that when it comes to picking winners "nobody knows anything" this much I am absolutely sure of: You're going to need all the luck you can get.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.


Comment by clicking here.

JWR contributor Bernard Goldberg, the television news reporter and author of several bestselling books, among them, Bias, a New York Times number one bestseller about how the media distort the news. He is widely seen as one of the most original writers and thinkers in broadcast journalism. Mr. Goldberg covered stories all over the world for CBS News and has won 10 Emmy awards for excellence in journalism. He now reports for the widely acclaimed HBO broadcast Real Sports.

He is a graduate of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey and a member of the school's Hall of Distinguished Alumni and proprietor of BernardGoldberg.com.


Previously:

03/28/11: The Pundits Are Driving Me Crazy --- And You Thought Qadaffi Is Nuts
03/14/11: No Liberal Bias at NPR — Just Ask NPR
03/10/11: The media's frustration
03/01/11: Progressives Lost in Time . . .
02/23/11: The Lamestreams Strike Again --- This Time in Madison
02/03/11: You MUST Own a Gun --- Or Else!
01/20/11: It Was Horrible, I tell you … HORRIBLE!
01/11/11: Here We Go Again . . .
01/06/11: You Go, Oprah
12/28/10: A Year-Ender --- The MSM and Obama's Fall from Grace 12/14/10: Thank
Heaven for Rich People

12/02/10: The Phony Nobility of Wikileaks

© 2011, Bernard Goldberg

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