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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 7, 2006 / 9 Nissan, 5766

Hillary vs. Hillary

By Dick Morris


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Hillary may need to break into a sweat after all.


In the wake of Jeanine Pirro's awkward withdrawal from the race, many assumed that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton's only re-election challenge would be trying to beat the New York blowout record set by Sen. Chuck Schumer in 2004. But the latest poll by John Zogby indicates that Hillary suddenly has a food fight on her hands.


In his first poll after Pirro dropped out on Jan. 13, Zogby had Hillary ahead of GOP challenger John Spencer by 61 percent to 31 percent. But in his most recent survey, conducted March 27, her margin had fallen to 54-33.


Hillary's drop did not reflect any aggressive paid media push by Spencer. He has yet to run his first ad. Rather, Hillary is losing the key contest of Hillary vs. Hillary - her negatives are rising.


In New York City, she dropped from a 68-19 lead to 62-25. In the suburbs, she fell from 55-36 to 48-41. Upstate, her edge went from 57-38 to 43-42.


Suddenly, it's a race.


Animating Hillary's drop are losses on all ends of the political spectrum. She's down by six points among Democrats, and by 12 with Republcians. But her key falloff is among independents - from 64 percent to 49 percent.


What's the problem? Some on the left may find her too pro-war, while others may be reacting to her newly prominent stridency as a critic of the Bush administraion. After six years of studied moderation and respectful silence, the Hillary Clinton who poured coffee for her fellow senators is now yielding the spotlight to the loud, partisan critic.


And her candidacy for president may be eroding her support in New York. The more visible she is on the national stage and the more she seems to be warming up for a run in 2008, the more some New York voters will feel betrayed.


It is easy now to look back and say that Hillary ran for Senate in 2000 in order to set up a presidential bid. But, in 2000, very few voters would have believed that she was going to run for president.


Whatever the cause, Hillary's drop in popularity means Spencer had better look out. (It's hard to see how K.T. McFarland can stay in the race much longer.) This dose of negative poll data may well prompt the Clinton campaign to dip into her her vast war chest to go on-air with ads. But if Spencer raises the money his current standing in the polls deserves, he'll be able to counter Hillary and erode her lead further.


Eileen McGann co-authored this column.

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