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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb 11, 2014 / 11 Adar I, 5774

The Romance in Your Past

By Froma Harrop



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | My family has one member of the Greatest Generation left. Aunt Shirley suffers some frailties of old age, but her mind is totally sharp. Her role of late has been as wise matriarch — to advise the rest of us on our revolving and evolving relationships, messes and issues.

Then Jack turned up, and Aunt Shirley was transformed from observer of others' romances to key player. Now pushing 90, she is living the fantasy of so many — the never-married, divorced, widowed — that they will someday connect with a lost love of long ago. In Jack's case, we're talking 70 years.

We knew about Jack Stettner because he lived forever near the front of Aunt Shirley's photo album. He was that magnificent pilot in Air Force uniform.

One photo showed them grinning in front of the Cyclone roller coaster at Coney Island. In another, they posed with a tiny airplane that Jack trained on. Aunt Shirley said he took her up in it and let her work the controls. She never learned to drive but said she enjoyed "flying" Jack's plane. In her words, "Unlike driving, there was nothing to hit up there."

We had questions: Where did they meet? They met passing on the boardwalk. Aunt Shirley was with a friend, and Jack with his brother. We knew that Jack called her Paddy, a nickname taken from her last name, Paderofsky. They were obviously smitten.

It was wartime, and Jack wanted to get married. Aunt Shirley said that at 18, she was too young at the time. But they wrote letters back and forth as Jack went off on very dangerous missions flying B-24s on bombing runs over China and navigating over India's treacherous "hump," the sky-piercing Himalayas.

He had named his airplane "Paddy." On one trip, realizing that the crew didn't have enough fuel to make it over looming peaks, they all bailed out.

Jack spent the night in a field sleeping in his parachute before being picked up by friendly Chinese. He mailed Aunt Shirley his parachute, covered in China's red dust, and the keys to the plane. One crew member was never found.



What happened to Jack? We kept asking. Is he alive, and if so, where is he? Aunt Shirley had no answers until last year, when Jack's children tracked her down online, beginning with her father's address listed in the 1940 census.

Their lives had gone separate ways. Aunt Shirley married another Brooklyn neighbor, a soldier serving in Europe. Jack eventually returned, remaining active in the Air Force.

As the war ended, a plane taking Air Force personnel back home crashed into Mount Tom, in Massachusetts. Jack married the sister of one of the airmen who had perished. They enjoyed a long relationship, which ended in his wife's death in 2008, the same year Aunt Shirley lost her husband.

Jack's three children knew about his long-ago love and went on an exhaustive search for "Paddy." It turned out she was living in Boynton Beach, Fla., only a few miles from Jack in Delray Beach.

A reunion was arranged. When they met, Jack kissed Aunt Shirley and said he'd always loved her, which he repeats after each meeting. He carried the letters she had written him seven decades ago. Recently turned 90, Jack has lost some hearing, but he's still upright and handsome.

Jack's family is now our family, and we are their family. Both elders need help getting to places, and they have it.

Where does this relationship go from here? What does it matter on a circle? As is said, "hearts can be broken, but circles go on forever."

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