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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb. 15, 2008 / 9 Adar I 5768

Marketing garbage

By Lori Borgman

Lori Borgman
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | It is a luxury I will die without: the $18 Rachael Ray garbage bowl.


Rachel Ray is the cute-as-a-button girl-next-door with the wildly successful "30-Minute Meals" shows. She also has a daytime talk show, a slug of cookbooks, cookware galore and now, her very own garbage bowl.


Who knew that the pinnacle of success would be having your name attached to a garbage bowl?


I'm pretty sure we've lost it.


It's a bowl, right? Plastic, even. You could get four big plastic bowls at any mega-mart for the same price, but because this is like the one Rachel Ray throws garbage in on her cooking show, it goes for 18 smackers.


The bowl doesn't have any special features. It doesn't have a suction bottom to anchor it to the counter, no pour spout and it's not rated for 1,200 degrees heat. It doesn't roll over, bark or play dead.


It's a bowl. A bowl for garbage.


Seems to me there might be some intermediate steps to try before buying a designer bowl to hold eggshells and banana peels. Here's a golden oldie: pull the trash can out from beneath the sink and put it by your feet when you work.


Or try this one: dump kitchen scraps in an old Cool Whip container. Or in an empty sour cream container. Or in an empty deli container.


My personal favorite is having a brown grocery sack by my feet when I cook. There's nothing like the satisfaction of making a hook shot with an empty tomato sauce can and hearing that glorious hollow "thud."


Or here's one - and, granted it's a little out there - hang an actual trash bag from a cupboard knob and use it for garbage.


But none of those solutions is marketable. You don't have to buy a single thing, you're using what you already have. You're being resourceful. What a dud.


I'm not knocking the garbage bowl, it's a good bowl. It does everything a bowl should do - it sits there without giving you any sass, holds things and looks very bowl-like.


I'm just wondering when we became so affluent, coddled, and cushy that we need designer bowls to hold garbage? Bowls remarkably similar to the bowls we already have.


Perhaps the garbage bowl is like a consolation prize. If I can't look like Rachel, or cook like Rachael, at least I can make garbage like Rachael.


If I can't cook like Emeril, at least I can buy knives like Emeril and chop like Emeril. If I can't be a domestic diva like Martha Stewart, I at least can buy her stemware, dinnerware, 600-count sheets, towels, muffin tins and play like I'm Martha.


It's always so much easier to buy the gizmos and gadgets than to actually acquire the skills.


Here's the real kicker to the garbage bowl. When you're finished dumping the apple peels, orange rinds, onion skins, garlic mush and tomato innards from this rough and tumble, guaranteed-to-last-for-many-years bowl, the instructions say, "Hand wash."


Sounds kind of prissy for a bowl that holds trash.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Lori Borgman is the author of , most recently, "Pass the Faith, Please" (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) and I Was a Better Mother Before I Had Kids To comment, please click here. To visit her website click here.

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© 2008, Lori Borgman

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