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December 2, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Defending the Right to a Jewish State

Heather Hale: Compliment your kids without giving them big heads

Megan Shauri: 10 ways you are ruining your own happiness

Carolyn Bigda: 8 Best Dividend Stocks for 2015

Kiplinger's Personal Finance editors: 7 Things You Didn't Know About Paying Off Student Loans

Samantha Olson: The Crucial Mistake 55% Of Parents Are Making At Their Baby's Bedtime

Densie Well, Ph.D., R.D. Open your eyes to yellow vegetables

The Kosher Gourmet by Megan Gordon With its colorful cache of purples and oranges and reds, COLLARD GREEN SLAW is a marvelous mood booster --- not to mention just downright delish
April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan 6, 2014 / 5 Shevat, 5774

Thank a Cop

By Diane Dimond




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Not since the days when Wyatt Earp worked the Wild West wearing a badge and a gun has there been such good news for law enforcement.

The number of federal, state, local, tribal and territorial officers in the U.S. who died in the line of duty last year dropped to a total of 111. Think about that. In the whole United States of America we lost only 111 officers during 2013. That's the lowest number since 1959.

The most encouraging news in the latest report from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund is seen in the death-by-gun category. At a time when there is so much worry about rampant gun deaths, only 33 officers, nationwide, lost their lives in the line of duty because of a firearm fatality. The number would have been even lower had it not been for a former Los Angeles cop named Christopher Dorner who went on a shooting spree last February and killed four people, including three L.A. police officers.

The number of law enforcement gun deaths hasn't been that low since 1887, back in the post-gold rush days when deputized frontiersmen tried to keep the peace in places with names like Tombstone, Ariz.

So, at a time when the country seems consumed with worry about mass shootings such as the ones at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.; the school in Newtown, Connecticut; and the movie theatre in Aurora, Colorado how is it that law enforcement is enjoying such a low mortality rate?

NLEOMF Chairman and CEO, Craig Floyd, attributes it to an increased "culture of safety" within police departments. For example, Floyd says, after a spike in officer gun deaths in 2011, more members of law enforcement routinely began wearing bulletproof vests.

"The only good news is zero deaths," Floyd said, "But this very significant drop in law enforcement fatalities the past two years is extremely encouraging."

Let's get real. The lower police mortality rate is not all attributable to cops being more careful while on the job. Our justice system is keeping more criminals behind bars and for longer periods of time. Massive prison overcrowding, nationwide, proves that.



There have been major developments in crime fighting technology, such as strategic placement of surveillance cameras in trouble spots. There has been a push to complete a backlog of DNA tests helping pinpoint viable suspects, and that keeps officers out of risky investigative situations. And let's not forget the active gun buy-back programs and neighborhood watch campaigns that help keep our streets safer.

In addition, the American population is aging. The median age is now 37.2 years old — well past the prime crime-committing ages of 13 to 25.

While 39 people were executed for their crimes in America last year, I'm not convinced by arguments that capital punishment actually deters crime. If you look at a graph of annual crime statistics next to a graph of peak execution years (1997-2002), it is easy to see that the total number of crimes fluctuated only slightly. There is no measureable proof that criminals with murder in mind stop to re-think their actions because their ultimate punishment could be the death chamber. Most murderous lawbreakers aren't known for stopping to think things through.

There is surely a combination of factors that delivers to us the good news that there were fewer law enforcement deaths in 2013. And it's probably a good time for all of us to stop and think about all those brave men and women who leave their homes every day to keep us safe, knowing they could pay the ultimate price for simply doing their job.

Law enforcement deaths are also arbitrary. Can you imagine working in a career in which at any moment, you could die?

Last year, a majority of officers — 46 — lost their lives in traffic-related accidents. Eighteen died of job-related illnesses. Six fell to their deaths while working, two drowned, two others were stabbed to death, one was electrocuted, one died in a helicopter crash and one was blown to bits in an explosion.

No surprise that working on Friday and Saturday nights proved to be the most lethal, but Tuesday night also proved pretty deadly. February and September were a peace officer's most dangerous months. Most of the officers who died were male, 107 of them. Four were female and, on average, the dead were the parent of at least two children. The oldest officer to die was 70 and the youngest was 23.

The state of Texas led the nation with 13 fatalities, followed by California (10), Mississippi (10) and New York (10). Arkansas (6) rounded out the top five on the list.

The last officers to die were Sgt. Robert Baron of Sandoval County, N.M., who was struck by a car while investigating a crash and Sgt. Kevin Stauffer of Tupelo, Miss., who was killed while pursuing armed bank robbers.

Sadly, their names will soon be added to the nearly 20 thousand other names carved into the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Yes, while 2013 saw a record low death toll of law enforcement personnel, 2014 is probably a good time to stop a cop and say thanks.


Previously:


12/30/13 A Crime and Justice Wish List for 2014
12/23/13 Divorce American Style
12/16/13 Who Judges the Judges?
12/11/13 Corporations Are Liable, Shouldn't the Government Be Too?
12/09/13 Life After a Tabloid Scandal
12/11/11 The Cult of the Disgraced and Misplaced
11/03//11 Sunshine Laws Putting Citizens at Risk
10/27//11 Do Prisoners Deserve Free Medical Treatment?
10/17//11 No Justice From Justice
10/12//11 Paying the Price --- Twice
09/26/11 When is Photography a Crime?
09/19/11 Laws to Catch Up With Science

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Investigative journalist and syndicated columnist Diane Dimond has covered all manner of celebrity and pop culture stories.








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