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December 2, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Defending the Right to a Jewish State

Heather Hale: Compliment your kids without giving them big heads

Megan Shauri: 10 ways you are ruining your own happiness

Carolyn Bigda: 8 Best Dividend Stocks for 2015

Kiplinger's Personal Finance editors: 7 Things You Didn't Know About Paying Off Student Loans

Samantha Olson: The Crucial Mistake 55% Of Parents Are Making At Their Baby's Bedtime

Densie Well, Ph.D., R.D. Open your eyes to yellow vegetables

The Kosher Gourmet by Megan Gordon With its colorful cache of purples and oranges and reds, COLLARD GREEN SLAW is a marvelous mood booster --- not to mention just downright delish
April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

New college application questions encourage creative thinking

By Larry Gordon





Trying to get beyond the self-aggrandizing essays of the past, new college application questions aim to probe more deeply and reveal the student's personality


JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) "So where is Waldo, really?"

That's not the kind of question most high school seniors expect to find on their college admission applications. But it is one of the essay options that applicants to the University of Chicago face this year in their quest for a coveted freshman berth.

It is the kind of mind-stretching, offbeat or downright freaky essay question that is becoming more common these days as colleges and universities seek to pierce the fog of students' traditional self-aggrandizing essays detailing their accomplishments and hardships.



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From Caltech in the West to Wake Forest University in the East, more schools are serving up unusual essay prompts to gain better insights into young people's minds and personalities. Colleges also hope for more authenticity in a process skewed by parental intrusion, paid coaching and plagiarism.

"It's a way to see students who can think differently and go beyond their academic, intellectual and extracurricular comfort zones," said Garrett Brinker, an admissions official at University of Chicago. Those essays also "break up the monotony of the application process," for students and colleges.

The Common Application, the online site used by 488 colleges, offers such generic prompts as: "Discuss some issue of personal, local, national or international concern and its importance to you." The site makes it easier for would-be students to apply, even if some are half-hearted about enrolling.

But an increasing number of schools prefer to hear only from serious applicants "aware of the values of the institution," said Katy Murphy, president-elect of the National Assn. for College Admission Counseling.

So more colleges are adding online supplements that require head-scratching writing assignments. Examples include Tufts' "Celebrate your nerdy side"; Wake Forest's "Think of things that fascinated you when you were 10 years old — what has endured?"; Caltech's "Please describe an unusual way in which you have fun"; and Brandeis' "A package arrives at your door. After seeing the contents you know it's going to be the best day of your life. What's inside and how do you spend your day?"

For some students, the questions may lighten an otherwise burdensome task. But others are intimidated, said Murphy, who is college counseling director at Bellarmine College Preparatory, a high school in San Jose. "The colleges talk about the creativity of play and the philosophy of Plato. What the students are trying to figure out is: 'What do the colleges want me to say?' "

Judy Rothman, author of "The Neurotic Parent's Guide to College Admissions," said schools like curveball essay questions because "they are sick and tired of reading the same thing over and over again" and because the topics encourage teen authorship without adult coaching.

High school seniors have mixed reactions, she said: "For a kid who is natural writer, it is relief and a great break from the tedious process of the applications. For the kids who just want to get through all their applications, it's a nightmare because you can't recycle material."

Hannah Kohanzadeh, a Santa Monica High School senior, has embraced the trend. "So many schools don't pay attention to the little quirks students have. Those personal things can tell whether a student belongs there or not," she said. With deadlines two weeks away, she is finishing applications to Brandeis, Occidental and others.

For Occidental, an essay asked: "Identify and describe a personal habit or idiosyncrasy — of any nature — that helps define you." She wrote about how she flaps her arms when she gets excited about hearing good music or reading a great book, and tied it to her love of new ideas. "I start flying," she said.

For idiosyncrasies, other students described being so rushed that they brush their teeth in the shower, wearing certain underwear as a good luck charm for exams and falling in love too fast, according to Occidental's Dean of Admission Sally Stone Richmond. Inviting such revelations helps ease applicants' fears that they must appear perfect and is "an opportunity to seek candor in ways that won't be intimidating to the student," she said.

At Caltech, the question about having fun and others in a similar vein push applicants "to thoughtfully reflect and respond honestly about who they are," said Jarrid Whitney, executive director of admissions and financial aid.

Now and then, an applicant reveals something "probably borderline unethical or demeaning to others," Whitney said. For example a few years ago, someone wrote about spiking a teacher's coffee with a potentially dangerous chemical. The teacher was warned in time, and the student did not meet academic standards for Caltech anyway. But if he had, that essay probably would have convinced officials he was "not a great fit in our community," Whitney said.

University of Chicago, a pioneer in such essays, invites its students to propose topics for questions. A committee selects the winners. The optional "Where's Waldo?" query this year has attracted much attention from fans of the picture books that send children searching for characters. "It is something that can go with a lot of different angles," explained Brinker. Some essays recall growing up with the books, others invent Waldo adventures or make Waldo into a metaphor for world problems. One ambitious student created a treasure hunt, hiding a picture of the bespectacled Waldo in the campus library and providing hints to his whereabouts.

Sophie Salmore, a senior at Marlborough School in Los Angeles, tackled another Chicago question. It poses physicist Werner Heisenberg's claim that "you cannot know both the position and momentum of an electron with total certainty" and asks for other concepts that cannot be known simultaneously. She wrote about embarkation and outcome and detailed her first roller-coaster ride and the school vegetable garden she established.

At first, she found the application daunting and almost skipped it. Then, she said, she realized it allowed her to be "more than test scores and GPA. I felt I could express myself."

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© 2012, Los Angeles Times Distributed by MCT Information Services