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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan 24, 2012/ 29 Teves, 5772

A hair behind

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | As our country goes to pot, I find myself more focused on personal matters, such as this item from ABC News: Scientists may soon find a cure for baldness.

As it goes, researchers were surprised to discover that balding men have the same number of hair-producing stem cells as men with full heads of hair. If scientists can find a way to activate these stem cells, baldies will have hair again.

And that is good news for fellows like me, whose hair is beginning to recede some. Hair is more important than ever. I think I know why.

For most of human history, you see, the roles of men and women were clearly defined. Since basic survival was so difficult, the division of labor was very clear and imprinted on our DNA.

Thus, men tended to perform the tasks that required size and strength. We wrestled bear and elk, plowed fields and defended our families from plunderers.

Women, on the other hand, tended to manage other important tasks, focusing on the homestead.

Because there was more work for both men and women than there was time in the day, men and women didn't argue much over who did what and generally appreciated each other.

But as the technological revolution took hold, fewer jobs required strength and brawn. Technology made household chores much easier to accomplish.

While men were happy working assembly line jobs, women were at home getting bored. It soon became apparent -- during World War II, when women took to the factories -- that women could do the same jobs men did and just as well, if not better.

The modern battle of the sexes kicked into high gear.

Well, today, women have made tremendous advances. They're doing way better than their male counterparts in advanced education and excelling in high-paying professions.

Which is why men without hair are in such trouble.

In the old days, before the roles of men and women got blurred, even a fat, balding guy had a shot at the prom queen. Because women tended to be financially dependent on men, they were forced to consort with dull men of high moral character -- which they didn't mind so much as long as the fellows were CPAs.

Now that so many women are financially independent, they can be choosy, and who can blame them? They want fellows with full heads of hair and good looks. Bald men have it worse than ever.

Not only do they generally have trouble competing for women against their full-head-of-hair rivals, they tend to have trouble succeeding in all areas of life.

Look at the top male officials in any organization and it is rare to find one without a good head of thick "executive hair."

Look at our recent presidents: Obama, Bush II, Clinton, Bush I, Carter ... you have to go all the way back to Ford in the mid-'70s to find the last receding-hairline guy who made it to the top office. You have to go all the way back to Eisenhower in the '50s to find the last bald one.

My point: In the modern era, in which the roles of men and women are blurry and changing, bald fellows don't have a prayer.

That is a matter of concern for me -- a fellow whose hair is beginning to recede,

So I hope researchers are on the verge of finding a cure for baldness. But I'm in no rush.

Mitt Romney's hair is full, but Obama's hair is showing a touch of gray and thinning. I hope that portends the outcome of November's election.

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