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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan 3, 2012/ 8 Teves, 5772

Tips for Government ‘teleworkers’

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | In our era of smart technology devices, employees are able to access important company information anywhere and anytime.

Smart employers are taking advantage of the trend. They're saving big on office space and other costs by letting more of their employees work from home.

The idea is so sensible that even the feds are catching on. That's why Congress passed the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010. Of course, agencies require new laws, rules and hours of bureaucratic analysis before they attempt to implement anything as sensible as "teleworking."

Here are some tips for federal employees.

I have been teleworking for years (I'm writing this column from an office in my country home). I wear blue jeans or running clothes every day. I save a fortune on dry cleaning.

I never waste precious personal time in rush-hour traffic. I roll out of bed and get right to work -- and sneak afternoon naps to keep mentally sharp.

While there are lots of upsides to teleworking, there are some downsides.

For starters, it's much more difficult to participate in office politics -- of particular importance in the government sector, where licking boots is the key to career advancement.

In the private sector, you can get by for years by producing items of actual value -- items that help your organization reduce costs or increase sales and profits.

But in the public sector, where there are no profits and the goal is to increase annual funding, most teleworkers will need to produce even lengthier reports to demonstrate tangible evidence that they are "working."

Then again, in the very near future, there might be particular benefits unique to government teleworkers.

Any fool with basic math skills can see America is headed for a cliff. Government growth and spending continue to soar, whereas the private economy is barely growing. It's only a matter of time before even the federal government begins to cut employees.

But what safer place to be a government employee than under your desk in your own home office?

When the federal government finally begins to cut, it will be the invisible federal teleworker, who produces no reports and never phones into the office, who will sustain his career through retirement -- as large centralized governments, such as ours, aren't much good at keeping track of people or things.

It's true you are likely to get bored hiding in your home over the years -- isolation is one of the greatest threats to the well-being of a federal teleworker -- but I have some tips for that, too.

If you get lonely, consider getting a pet. Dogs require a lot of attention and frequent walks.

Depending on your access to federal credit cards, you might be able to find a way to pay for an assistant, so you will at least have someone to play checkers with.

Or you can try, as I did, to hire a 24-year-old Swedish nanny -- though, regrettably, the nanny agency assured me I needed to have a family.

In any event, surveys show that most federal agencies are way behind schedule as they establish frameworks to implement their government-mandated telework policies.

Still, I hope my tips will be of some assistance.

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