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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan. 5, 2011 / 19 Teves, 5771

Fascinating, not famous

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Every year about now, the media introduce us to the most fascinating people of the prior year.

They always overlook people like Joe Horne.

A tailgunner in the Army Air Corps during World War II, Horne and his crew enjoyed 11 successful missions.

They didn't expect to survive their 12th: orders to bomb a heavily guarded munitions plant in Munich.

As they approached their target, Horne fought off German fighter planes. German flak was another matter.

Heavy flak hit the plane hard. It lost altitude so fast that its windows shattered. The landing gear was destroyed.

Their only hope was to make it across the Swiss border for a crash landing.

As the plane's belly hit the ground -- as uprooted earth and stones whipped through the broken windows -- the pilot told the crew to evacuate before the plane exploded.

Horne dived out a window and was bruised and cut as he tumbled along the ground -- but he survived.

The Swiss would detain him in internment camps in Adelboden, Switzerland, for six months -- camps, writes Cathryn Prince in "Shot from the Sky," that were a dark secret of World War II.

So long as he did as told, he was free to move about the town. But he and a few others crossed the line when they got into a fistfight with Nazi sympathizers.

They spent 30 days in the Wauwilermoos military prison in Lucerne, where they received little food or water and plenty of beatings.

After his release there, he and his crew were about to attempt an escape from their camp when word arrived that all Americans detained in Switzerland were being repatriated.

On leave in Pittsburgh, Horne attended a dance. He fell hard for a striking woman across the room -- love at first sight. Her name was Dorothy Kvederis. He would marry her four years later.

He joined the post office in 1946, when he was discharged. After two and a half years of attending college at night, Horne decided to suspend his studies.

He was happy with his life.

By 1954, he and Dorothy had saved enough to buy a house -- the house in which he still lives.

He and Dorothy would be blessed with a daughter and two sons -- a teacher, dentist and corporate executive, respectively.

He loved his job. During the last 40 years of his 46-year postal career, he delivered mail in the Hill District.

Despite numerous opportunities to take over cushier routes inside air-conditioned high-rise buildings, he loved his route and would give it up only when he retired in 1992.

He and Dorothy finally had time to enjoy life. They traveled. They attended church every morning. They spent time with family and friends.

Their carefree existence ended on Oct. 4, 1992, when Dorothy suffered a stroke. Horne would spend the next 14 years caring for her -- getting no more than two hours of sleep every night -- until she died in 2006.

Now 85, he misses her desperately, but his days are full.

The old Irishman (his grandfather changed the family name from "Horan" to "Horne," hoping it would help him find work at a time when the Irish faced "need not apply" signs) is a passionate Notre Dame fan.

He has a zest for living and puts a spring in the step of anyone lucky enough to cross his path.

Yeah, he was never famous or rich, but he was surely influential. Great civilizations are built on the shoulders of such giants.

If only the media featured more people like Joe Horne at this time every year.


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